Breathwork Europe

Helping to heal, one breath at a time

 

Who Do We Think We Are? Superegos or Genuine Carers? by Gunnel Minett

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Judging by emails and other writings from Breathworkers around the world, there seems to be a growing trend to highlight the healing they provide. Not just on a one-to-one basis, but also healing of whole countries. 

In a recent email from the president of IBF she writes: “Every year for the past 22 years, the GIC has travelled to various parts of the world, bringing with it a very special energy. Over the last years, it has become very clear to me that there is a higher purpose behind every GIC destination. The GIC has often been held in special places in need of particular healing or in places where the IBF community can be replenished and nurtured in its essence.. and often both. “ 
And in a recent book, Australian breathworker John Stamoulos makes it very clear that he sees himself chosen for very important  healing work and describes in detail how many people he has affected by his healing presence. On his website he gives this information about himself: “From the first experience of Breathwork, he was fully aware of its power to heal. It has been his life’s focus ever since”. These are just two examples of many of how breathworkers see themselves as having an important role in ‘healing the planet’. 

Nothing wrong with healing

Of course there is nothing wrong with wanting to heal. We all want to do that, from very early childhood throughout life. This urge to heal is so deeply rooted that it can be described as hardwired in our body/brain. Nor is it limited to the human species. There are many stories of people risking, or even sacrificing their own lives to save animals. The reason for this strong urge to heal is that it is closely linked with survival. Helping others, creating an environment of healing will ultimately benefit the healer as well as the people being healed. So for all of us, breathworkers included, whether we heal on a one-to-one basis, near and dear ones or the whole planet, the end result will be a better place for everyone. 

Read more: Who Do We Think We Are? Superegos or Genuine Carers? by Gunnel Minett

Breathwork and First Responders by Dan Brule

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Breathing Training is a must for people who work in high stakes, high stress, or life or death situations. Breathwork Training is the next major key skillset that high performing individuals need to have.

Professionals need to show up at their best, every day, no matter what. In order to bring our best to an event, interaction, or a situation, we need to be in touch with ourselves and our internal resources; we need the energy to perform, and a certain level of comfort and ease in our body; and we must have with mental clarity and emotional balance.

People whose job it is to protect and save lives, to manage crisis situations, and coordinate emergency activities need to have guts, need to a head on their shoulders and need to be in touch with their heart.

First Responders need to know how to manage their physiology in order to maintain the clarity and presence required to ensure effective communication, organization and coordination of activities and resources.

Breathwork is a tool that can be used to focus awareness and channel energy. It is also the perfect tool for developing the qualities of mindfulness, resiliency, empathy, and intuition.

In an emergency, we need people who can remain calm and alert, relaxed and energized. In addition to operational skills, first responders need to know how to manage their mental and emotional state; and they need to be good at arousal control and attention control. And all of this comes down to breath control.

Read more: Breathwork and First Responders by Dan Brule

Methodology of Integration in breathwork by Tatiana Ginzburg

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Here I am going to present results of my recent research: “Methodology of Integration in breathwork”.

This research has been done by myself during the last couple of years. On 8th October 2004 I received official confirmation of a PhD degree in Psychology (Candidate of Science ) for my research dissertation at the International Academy of Psychology Science in Yaroslavl. I think the results I received and the theme of my research are quite relevant for the international breathwork community. Here I will present these results, in order to raise this theme, to get a feedback and perhaps have an opportunity to develop this theme further.

  1. Couple of words about myself

I have had experience of breathwork for about ten years, both as a client and as a therapist. During that period I was trained by the leading breathing-theory leaders of Russia (S. Gorsky, V. Kozlov, V. Maikov, G. Shirokov) as well as international recognized breathwork teachers, including Leonard Orr (USA) who invented Rebirthing Breathwork; Dan Brule (USA) – one of Orr’s first followers; Nemi Nath (Australia) – founder of the school “Breathconnection”; Cliff Lloyd (England) – ex-chairman of the British Rebirthers Society; and many others besides. For the last six years I have been giving individual breathwork sessions in different styles (Rebirthing Breathwork, Holotropic Breathwork™, VIVATION). I have conducted training in groups orientated towards both therapeutic and teaching purposes.

Read more: Methodology of Integration in breathwork by Tatiana Ginzburg

Therapeutic Breathwork by Jeremy Youst

Jeremy Youst“Everything breathes: breathing is the inspiration of Life within all living forms of reality. All matter is in a continual state of particle exchange. In humans, breathing is the biological basis and spiritual expression that renews life, propels awareness and focuses body-mind functioning in time and space.” (1st Principle of Conscious Connected Breathing – J. Youst)

Therapeutic Breathwork is the purposeful application of conscious, connected breathing in one-on-one or group settings, guided by a skilled practitioner and the Spirit of Breath, and held within a sacred container of a therapeutic intention, relationship and community.

The Spirit of Breath, in this case, refers to the multi-dimensional collective intelligence that naturally seeks harmony, balance and fulfillment, and seems to surround and guide the act of conscious breathing. Working therapeutically with the Spirit of Breath inspires most aspects of the client-therapist relationship, and provides for a heightened sense of safety, honesty, integrity and reality.

For thousands of years humans have found by changing the rate, ratio, volume and flow of the respiratory cycle, there can be experiential and perceptual shifts in consciousness, spiritual awareness, cognition and self-identity.  More recently, when applied therapeutically, the shifts experienced in conscious, connected breathing seem to be linked to a deeper sense of inner connection, somatic groundedness, emotional empowerment and psycho-spiritual integration.

Read more: Therapeutic Breathwork by Jeremy Youst

EXPLORING HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK: AN EMPIRICAL EVALUATION OF ALTERED STATES OF AWARENESS AND PATTERNS OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL SUBSYSTEMS WITH REFERENCE TO TRANSLIMINALITY

EXPLORING HOLOTROPIC BREATHWORK: AN EMPIRICAL EVALUATION OF ALTERED STATES OF AWARENESS AND PATTERNS OF PHENOMENOLOGICAL ... by AJ Rock, NC Denning, M Psych, GI Clark, DC Psy... - Association for ..., 2015

ABSTRACT: It is a long-standing assumption that holotropic breathwork (HB) induces an altered state of consciousness. However, this assumption has not been empirically tested. Consequently, 32 participants were recruited for the present study, which aimed to use the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (PCI) to quantify the pattern of phenomenological subsystems and Altered State of Awareness (ASA) scores associated with a HB condition relative to a comparison condition and a baseline assessment. The hypothesis that the HB group would report a different pattern of relationships among phenomenological subsystems relative to the comparison condition and baseline was partially supported. In addition, the hypothesis that, while controlling for baseline, the HB group would report higher ASA scores than the comparison group was supported. Finally, for the HB group, transliminality did not significantly improve the prediction of ASA, while controlling for baseline. Various suggestions for future research are discussed.

This is a pdf file that you can download by clicking on this link: http://www.atpweb.org/jtparchive/trps-47-15-01-3.pdf

ABSTRACT: It is a long-standing assumption that holotropic breathwork (HB) induces an altered state of consciousness. However, this assumption has not been empirically tested. Consequently, 32 participants were recruited for the present study, which aimed to use the Phenomenology of Consciousness Inventory (PCI) to quantify the pattern of phenomenological subsystems and Altered State of Awareness (ASA) scores associated with a HB condition relative to a comparison condition and a baseline assessment. The hypothesis that the HB group would report a different pattern of relationships among phenomenological subsystems relative to the comparison condition and baseline was partially supported. In addition, the hypothesis that, while controlling for baseline, the HB group would report higher ASA scores than the comparison group was supported. Finally, for the HB group, transliminality did not significantly improve the predicti
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